Visiting Hemingway at NYC Morgan Library

During a recent visit to New York, I had an opportunity to see the, first of its kind, Ernest Hemingway Exhibition at the Morgan Library on Madison Ave. in Manhattan. The exhibit is titled, Ernest Hemingway: Between Two Wars, and it looked at his life and work focusing primarily on the time period from 1919 through the late 1940’s.

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The exhibit, curated by Declan Kiely in collaboration with the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston, is broken into six sections. I was in a group of about 50 people who were taken through and shown each section by a lovely women who was excellent and in my opinion was well-read in regard to Hemingway. The first ever museum exhibit featured a collection of 100+ artifacts, including his passport, an original Hemingway portrait, photos, dog tags, and handwritten correspondence between Hemingway and his parents, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Dorothy Parker.

The six sections of the exhibit included: The “Prophet”(covered his early years through high school), World War I, Paris, Key West and Havana, World War II, and finally, An Old Hunter Talking to Gods.

During my three hour visit I picked up a copy of A.E. Hotchner’s new book, Hemingway in Love: His Own Story (St. Martin’s, 2015) at the Morgan Library bookstore, as well as a photo of E.H. There was also a copy of Hemingway’s Camping Out which I had not previously seen but fortunate for me a good friend made it a Christmas gift for me.

I would highly recommend a visit to experience Ernest Hemingway: Between Two Wars – on display at the Morgan through Jan. 31, 2016.

Complete Online Version of Hemingway’s in our time

In_our_time_Paris_edition_1924Here is a complete version of Ernest Hemingway’s 1924 novel, in our time, which is his collection of short stories about the years before, during, and after World War I. There are fifteen short stories, or chapters, in Hemingway’s work and each one begins with a short vignette.

Hemingway Quote Found in Boston’s North End

You just never know when you will come across something involving the wide scope of Ernest Hemingway. It may be finding a copy of one of Papa’s classic novels in an old bookstore (which has happened to a few of us!). But how many of you have come across a Hemingway quote in a bathroom of all places in Boston? Well if you eat at Neptune Oyster in Boston’s North End (the food was great) you will see the following quote:

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Hemingway’s Green Hills of Africa Gets a New Skin

Credit: http://simonandshuster.com
Credit: http://simonandshuster.com

Ernest Hemingway’s 1935 classic Green Hills of Africa has been updated as part of The Hemingway Literary Edition. This was Hemingway’s second venture into the world of nonfiction, following Death in the Afternoon (1932).

Both Patrick and Sean Hemingway have added new sections: the foreword and the new introduction. The four new sections at the end of the book include:

  1. Appendix 1: Pauline Pfieffer Hemingway’s Journal (1933-1934).
  2. Appendix 11: Introductory Letter from Hemingway and Safari Notes
  3. Appendix 111: The Tanganyika Letters
  4. Appendix 1v: Early Drafts and Deleted Passages from GHA

The section from Pauline Pfieffer, Hemingway’s second wife, offers an interesting perspective. She studied writing at the University of Missouri and received her undergraduate degree in journalism, she wrote for Vogue magazine in Paris and Vanity Fair and she definitely offers a “fresh perspective.”

His book is the result of a month long African safari in December 1933 with his wife Pauline.

Additional Reading

Books of the Time, NY Times, October, 1935

Green Hills of Africa – Writer on Writer Blog

Hemingway’s Paris by Robert Wheeler

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Credit: Amazon.com

I received a copy of a great book today titled Hemingway’s Paris: A Writer’s City in Words and Images by Robert Wheeler (Yucca Publishing, 180 pages, 2015). The author, Robert Wheeler is a photojournalist and professor at Southern New Hampshire University, where he teaches courses in writing and on Hemingway. Professor Wheeler was awarded the Excellence in Teaching Award for 2006.

As you read through this wonderfully written and designed book, you feel like you’re back in the 1920’s walking along the Quai St. Michel in Paris with Hemingway by your side.

The book contains five sections that contain more than 80 beautiful, black and white, photos of Paris as seen through the eyes of Wheeler’s Ernest Hemingway.

If you’re interested in Hemingway or Paris, this book is a must read.

Suggested Reading

Ernest Hemingway and the Highs and Lows of Paris by Sam Jordison (The Guardian, 2012)

Two Classic Book Stores with Many Hemingway Titles

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Credit: http://bookbarnniantic.com/

This past summer I came across a fantastic old book store in Niantic, CT, called the Book Barn. There were multiple locations in this small, sea-side village which was fortunate for me.  Niantic is a small village, with a population of barely 3,000 in the town of East Lyme, CT.  One of the locations had books literally housed everywhere on every inch of the property (see photo).  The first question I typically ask is when walking into any bookstore is, “Do you have anything regarding Hemingway?” I ended up getting a mint copy of Hemingway in Spain (Double Day & Co., 1974) by Jose Luis Catillo-Puche, a copy of Peter Griffin’s Along With Youth: Hemingway the Early Years (Oxford University Press, 1985).  This book also has a 1988 inscription from Peter Griffin himself to a student by the name of “Joan.”  I also picked up a hard copy of A.E. Hotchner’s Papa Hemingway (Random House, 1966).  I had only read the paperback version of his book and this was in excellent condition.  I always liked Hemingway’s quote that is before the foreword of the book and reads:

“There are some things which cannot be learned quickly, and time, which is all we have, must be paid heavily for their acquiring.  They are very simplest things, and because it takes a man’s life to know them the little new that each man gets from life is very costly and the only heritage he has to leave.”  Ernest Hemingway

 

The second book store was called Books on the Square located on 471 Angell Street in good ole’ Providence, R.I. This book has a great location and included a great collection of books with a few Hemingway titles as well. I ended up getting an updated copy of The Sun Also Rises (Scribner, 2014). This was The Hemingway Library Edition. If you’re in the area check out these two classic book stores.

Additional Reading

Edition Has Alternate Opening of ‘Sun Also Rises’ by Patricia Cohen (New York Times, July 2014).

To Use And Use Not by Julie Bosman (New York Times, 2012).

Author Sternbergh Comments on Ernest Hemingway

The comments from Author Adam Sternbergh, a Toronto-born journalist who lives in Brooklyn, N.Y., published his debut novel, Shovel Ready, a sci-fi/noir hybrid set in a near-future New York that has seen better days; its sequel, Near Enemy, will arrive in bookstores this month. I thought his comments about which books has he reread the most were very interesting (from the website The Globe and Mail):

Which books have you reread most in your life?

Ernest Hemingway, Mary HemingwayConfession: I’m a slow reader.  And I always feel shamelessly under-read. I could fill this page with the names of essential authors I still haven’t gotten around to, and those are just the ones I want to read, not the ones I feel I should read. One book I’ve read multiple times, and will read multiple times in the future, is For Whom the Bell Tolls by you-know-who. It’s more fashionable now to dislike (or, worse, dismiss) Ernest Hemingway than to like him, and even though this book was rapturously reviewed at the time, it isn’t now popularly considered to be his best. But this novel checks all my boxes. When it was published in 1940 (that decade again!), a critic at The New Yorker wrote, “I do not much care whether or not this is a ‘great’ book. I feel that it is what Hemingway wanted it to be: a true book.”